Will You Stop Purchasing Chinese Goods?

August 20, 2007 at 12:47 PM 5 comments

Last week Mattel recalled millions of toys produced in China. Earlier this summer the FDA warned consumers of a poisonous chemical found in certain toothpastes imported from China and in April of this year 16 cats and dogs died and thousands were sickened as a result of tainted pet food linked to a Chinese manufacturer.

To U.S. consumers price seems to be the most significant factor in purchasing decisions. These days it’s tough to find a product that isn’t made in China. I wonder, when did the quality and safety of goods become unimportant to U.S. consumers? Remember when Japanese car manufacturers trumped U.S. competition? The distinguishing factor: the quality of Japanese goods. Isn’t it odd that Americans care so much about quality when it comes to cars and electronics but care so little when it comes to everyday goods?

It seems that we have become a throw away society, filling the landfills with cheap products, and replacing them with even cheaper ones. In a free market consumers have complete influence over the goods they purchase. If we continue to purchase cheap, Chinese goods, stores will continue to market them to us. Personally I’d like to see Americans buying quality goods once again. I wonder if the latest recalls will prompt Americans to turn their backs on Chinese goods. Do you think the recent recalls have scared Americans into thinking more about safety and quality or do you think Americans will continue to base purchasing decisions on cost alone?

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5 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Anonymous  |  August 20, 2007 at 2:15 PM

    I think for a while people may think twice about buying something made in China but, in about a month everyone will have forgotten. People will think about their wallet first. I have to say I have been looking at my childrens toys and 95% of them are made in China. With all the recalls I have begun trying to find toys made in the US and it is very hard!! Crazy!!
    Laurie

    Reply
  • 2. Amie  |  August 20, 2007 at 7:17 PM

    There is a great post on this very topic over at Angry Chicken:
    http://angrychicken.typepad.com/angry_chicken/2007/08/not-made-in-chi.html

    I have been giving it some thought, and it is a sad truth that I don’t have the money available to invest in quality. We have to buy as inexpensively as possible (secondhand, if available), then use it until it breaks-then repair it. I have been learning to make more things myself, but as pointed out by Angry Chicken, you still have to watch your materials.

    We really do need to change our attitude as a society.

    Reply
  • 3. Anonymous  |  August 20, 2007 at 10:30 PM

    If American workers wouldn’t insist on such high pay, we’d be able to produce more items, at an affordable cost. However, since we want all Americans to receive a good paycheck, it costs too much to produce items that we can all afford to buy.

    Can’t have it both ways.

    Reply
  • 4. One Frugal Girl  |  August 20, 2007 at 11:14 PM

    A while back John Ratzenberger hosted a great show called Made in America. If you are interested in buying American made products you can check out the list of factories John visited here.

    Oh and Amie — I enjoyed the angry chicken link. I have never visited that site before.

    Reply
  • 5. One Frugal Girl  |  September 1, 2007 at 4:19 PM

    To learn more about lead in children’s toys click here.

    Reply

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