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Would You Take a Homemade Sandwich to a Restaurant?

So here’s a frugal question… Someone I know, (I swear this story is not about me), has been brown bagging lunches in an effort to save money and eat a more balanced diet. One afternoon a bunch of coworkers asked if she’d like to go out to lunch with them. She considered the offer, but didn’t really want to waste a perfectly good sandwich.

She knew the lunch she packed was healthier and cheaper than one she would buy, but she didn’t want to eat alone while all her other coworkers went out together. After contemplating the options she decided to head out for lunch with her coworkers, but decided to bring her sandwich along for the ride.

When she got to the restaurant three of her coworkers purchased meals, while she purchased only a drink and chips. The four of them sat outside of the restaurant and ate their lunches at a picnic table.

After the incident a couple of coworkers commented that they would not have been comfortable taking homemade sandwiches to an establishment and one woman said she thought it was ‘wrong to bring your own food.’

So here’s my question… Do you think it is wrong to bring a homemade sandwich to a restaurant? The woman reasoned that she did purchase chips and a drink so she did not freeload on the restaurant and because her friends were eating at the same table she did not unnecessarily take up a seat. What do you think?

Red

Sunday 14th of November 2010

I love that she had the balls to do that! If only I had done that the many times my coworkers at my last job asked me to go out to lunch... Well, I might not have gained 20 pounds in six months! ;)

Seriously though, when we were younger, my parents would take one of my brothers to McDonald's because he didn't like the food at the restaurant we were visiting. We'd bring his McDonald's in with us to a different restaurant. I see nothing wrong with it. Like she said, she wasn't freeloading or taking up a seat. Good for her!

And to the restaurant owner who had a problem with it, I would ask you - does your restaurant have a minimum purchase requirement? If not, it's not this woman's fault. She could have just as easily ordered a water and a side salad. (Which probably only costs $2.99.) What's wrong with that?

p.s. I've started bringing my own water bottle to restaurants. I hate paying $2.39 for a glass of tea, and I don't like to risk ordering water that tastes disgusting. So I bring my own, and no one has ever said anything. If they did, I'd go elsewhere to eat.

Anonymous

Saturday 25th of July 2009

You are utilizing the restaurant staffs time by sitting in a seat and ordering just a drink or chips. It is against most state health codes to bring in your own food or drink to a restaurant. If you can't afford to eat out. Stay home. If you are cheap.. eat at McDonalds. They may not care. As a restaurant owner, many seats filled with two or four dollar sales will put me out of business. People I pay will clean up after you, wash your silverware or dish, refill the condiments you may have used all for the pennies I make on your soda, its not right. Be respectful, a restaurant is a business and as such keep in mind there is an army of people cooking, cleaning and serving you. That woman should have politely declined.

It doesn't depend on any circumstance, factor or amount of overpriced or cheaply priced items you buy.. Its wrong. Go eat in a public park with your friend and her take out. If you don't agree, you are probably just cheap!

Abigail

Monday 8th of June 2009

Generally speaking, I don't think it's a good idea. But since they were outside the actual restaurant, I guess it's okay.

I probably would have eaten the sandwich on the way over (or after the actual meal disbanded). Still, as long as she wasn't in the actual establishment, I guess it's kosher.

Slinky

Tuesday 2nd of June 2009

I don't see the problem with this situation at all. It's one thing if the person doesn't purchase something and is preventing other customers from using that space during a busy time. But she bought food, and wasn't inconveniencing anyone. Generally, if she's not hurting the place's business by doing so and the management doesn't object, I don't see the problem.

Mimi

Monday 1st of June 2009

Absolutely, especially if others in the group are buying meals. I have an extremely picky grandson and he always carries a brown bag of food to most restaurants and orders only a drink. Everyone else in the family orders meals, so I see no problem with this.